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    Vol. XVII, No. 17, 1st August 2013

    Special Edition

     

    POPE FRANCIS MEETS THE FELLOW JESUITS

     

    On July 31, the feast of St. Ignatius of Loyola, the founder of the Society of Jesus, Pope Francis wished to meet his fellow Jesuits in Rome to celebrate the Eucharist in the Church of Jesus. There were about 300 Jesuits as well as some close lay collaborators and representatives of women's Congregations of Ignatian inspiration.  The celebration began with a greeting, "our brother Francis" by Father General. At the end of the celebration Pope Francis prayed and lit a lamp before the altar of St. Ignatius, visited the Chapel of Madonna della Strada, the altar of Saint Francis Xavier and the tomb of Fr Pedro Arrupe.

    Below, please find the complete text of Pope Francis' homily. 

     

    "In this Eucharist in which we celebrate our Father Ignatius of Loyola, in light of the readings we have heard, I would like to propose three simple thoughts guided by three expressions: to put Christ and the Church in the centre; to allow ourselves to be conquered by Him in order to serve; to feel the shame of our limitations and our sins, in order to be humble before Him and before the brothers.


    1. The emblem of us Jesuits is a monogram, the acronym of "Jesus, the Saviour of Mankind" (IHS). Every one of you can tell me: we know that very well! But this crest continually reminds us of a reality that we must never forget: the centrality of Christ for each one of us and for the whole Society, the Society that Saint Ignatius wanted to name "of Jesus" to indicate the point of reference. Moreover, even at the beginning of the Spiritual Exercises he places our Lord Jesus Christ, our Creator and Saviour (Spiritual Exercises, 6) in front of us. And this leads all of us Jesuits, and the whole Society, to be "decentred," to have "Christ more and more" before us, the "Deus semper maior", the "intimior intimo meo", that leads us continually outside ourselves, that brings us to a certain kenosis, a "going beyond our own loves, desires, and interests" (Sp. Ex., 189). Isn't it obvious, the question for us? For all of us? "Is Christ the centre of my life? Do I really put Christ at the centre of my life?" Because there is always the temptation to want to put ourselves in the centre. And when a Jesuit puts himself and not Christ in the centre, he goes astray.

    In the first reading, Moses forcefully calls upon the people to love the Lord, to walk in His ways, "because He is your life" (cf. Deut. 30, 16-20). Christ is our life! The centrality of Christ corresponds also to the centrality of the Church: they are two flames that cannot be separated: I cannot follow Christ except in and with the Church. And even in this case we Jesuits and the whole Company, are not at the centre, we are, so to speak, "displaced", we are at the service of Christ and of the Church, the Bride of Christ our Lord, who is our Holy Mother Hierarchical Church (cf. Sp. Ex. 353). To be men routed and grounded in the Church: that is what Jesus desires of us. There cannot be parallel or isolated paths for us. Yes, paths of searching, creative paths, yes, this is important: to go to the peripheries, so many peripheries. This takes creativity, but always in community, in the Church, with this membership that give us the courage to go forward. To serve Christ is to love this concrete Church, and to serve her with generosity and with the spirit of obedience.


    2. What is the way to live this double centrality? Let us look at the experience of Saint Paul, which was also the experience of Saint Ignatius. The Apostle, in the Second Reading that we heard, writes: I press on towards the perfection of Christ, "because I have indeed been conquered by Jesus Christ" (Phil. 3:12). For Paul it came along the road to Damascus, for Ignatius in his house at Loyola, but the fundamental point is the same: to allow oneself to be conquered by Christ. I seek Jesus, I serve Jesus, because He sought me first, because I was conquered by Him: and this is the heart of our experience. But He is first, always. In Spanish there is a word that is very graphic, that explains this well: He "primerea" first ahead of us, "El nos primerea". He is always first. When we arrive, He has already arrived and is expecting us.

    And here I want to recall the meditation on the Kingdom in the Second Week. Christ our Lord, the eternal King, calls each one of us, saying to us: "He who wants to come with Me must work with Me, because following Me in suffering, he will follow after Me likewise in glory" (Sp. Ex. 95): Being conquered by Christ in order to offer to this King our whole person and all our hard work (cf. Sp. Ex. 96); to say to the Lord that he would do anything for His greater service and praise, to imitate Him in bearing even injury, contempt, poverty (Sp. Ex. 98). But I think of our brother in Syria in this moment. To allow ourselves to be conquered by Christ means to be always directed towards what is in front of me, toward the goal of Christ (cf. Phil. 3:14), and to ask oneself with truth and sincerity: "What have I done for Christ? What am doing for Christ? What must I do for Christ?" (cf. Sp. Ex. 53).


    3. And I come to the final point. In the Gospel, Jesus says to us: "Whoever would save his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life for my sake will save it . . . If anyone is ashamed of me . . ." (Lk 9:23). And so on. The shame of the Jesuit. The invitation that Jesus makes is for us to never be ashamed of Him, but to always follow Him with total dedication, trusting Him and entrusting ourselves to Him.

    But looking at Jesus, as Saint Ignatius teaches us in the First Week, above all looking at Christ crucified, we have that very human and noble feeling that is the shame of not reaching the highest point; we look at the wisdom of Christ and at our ignorance; at His omnipotence and our weakness; at His justice and our iniquity; at His goodness and our wickedness (cf. Sp. Ex. 59). Ask for the grace of shame; the shame that comes from the constant dialogue of mercy with Him; the shame that makes us blush before Jesus Christ; the shame that puts us in tune with the heart of Christ who is made sin for me; the shame that harmonizes our heart in tears and accompanies us in the daily following of "my Lord".

    And this always brings us, as individuals and as a Society, to humility, to living this great virtue. Humility that makes us understand, each day, that it is not for us to build the Kingdom of God, but it is always the grace of God working within us; humility that pushes us to put our whole being not at the service of ourselves and our own ideas, but at the service of Christ and of the Church, like clay pots, fragile, inadequate, insufficient, but having within them an immense treasure that we carry and that we communicate (2 Cor. 4:7).


    It is always pleasant for me to think of the sunset of the Jesuit, when a Jesuit finishes his life, when the sun goes down. And two icons of the sunset of the Jesuit always come to me: one classical, that of Saint Francis Xavier, looking at China. Art has painted this sunset so many times, this 'end' of Xavier. Even in literature, in that beautiful peace by Pemàn. At the end, having nothing, but in the sight of the Lord; it does me good to thing about this.

    The other sunset, the other icon that comes to me as an example, is that of Padre Arrupe in the last interview in the refugee camp, when he told us - something he himself said - "I say this as if it were my swan song: pray." Prayer, the union with Jesus. And, after having said this, he caught the plane, and arrived at Rome with the stroke that was the beginning of so long and so exemplary a sunset. Two sunsets, two icons that all of us would do well to look at, and to go back to these two. And to ask for the grace that our sunset will be like theirs.


    Dear brothers, let us turn again to Our Lady, to her who bore Christ in her womb and accompanied the first steps of the Church. May she help us to always put Christ and His Church at the centre of our lives and of our ministry. May she, who was the first and most perfect disciple of her Son help us to allow ourselves to be conquered by Christ in order to follow Him and to serve Him in every situation. May she that answered the announcement of the Angel with the most profound humility: "Behold the handmaid of the Lord, be it done unto me according to thy word" (Lk 1:38), make us feel the shame for our inadequacy before the treasure that has been entrusted to us, in order to live the virtue of humility before God. May our journey be accompanied by the paternal intercession of Saint Ignatius and of all the Jesuit saints, who continue to teach us to do all things ad majorem Dei gloriam."


    THE WELCOME GREETINGS OF FATHER GENERAL

     

    I want to thank our Brother Francisco - in the name of the Society - for joining us today in this celebration.

    I have been saying to our men how much Francisco feels like a Jesuit who has gone very deep into the Ignatian spirit. Now, coming back from Rio, in that surprise Press Conference,

    Francisco said: "I think like a Jesuit". Thinking and feeling in one. Earlier he told me about today: "I just want to celebrate Saint Ignatius with my brother Jesuits".

    We want to hear what Francisco wants to ask from us. But mostly we want to experience (and we are already experiencing it) how natural and how pleasant it is the Union with Peter, our head, that has always been so dear to all Jesuits, from Saint Ignatius to Arrupe and Kolvenbach

    Our Gratitude, Francisco, from the bottom of our hearts.